Joust of Peace

An а plaisance joust between two knights, usually done at tournament or between knights who want to test their prowess against one another. Jousts, where individual knights demonstrated their prowess, grew in popularity from the 13th century onward; prior to that knights fought in tournaments primarily in groups. Frequently galleries of ladies were present to watch jousts of peace, sometimes offering elaborate favors to the knights who championed their honor. During the late 15th and 16th centuries, specialized armour that became very heavy was fashionable to use in the joust, great hulking pieces featuring many reinforcing plates and bolts, giving the harnesses a very alien appearance.

Medieval glossary. 2014.

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  • Joust of peace — Some tournaments took place with the intention of limiting the threat of serious injury or death. For example, in 1278, a Tournament of Peace was held at Windsor. None of the weapons were made of metal: swords were bone, shields wooden, the… …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Joust — The joust was the familiar fight between knights on horseback with lance and shield. It evolved from the *hastilude and *melee, becoming an exhibition but one using real skills, with a genuine threat of serious injury or death. Unlike the melee,… …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Joust — Tournament or combat of two mounted knights, tilting using lances. The charge of two knights bearing shield and lance. See also the Joust of Peace and Joust of War …   Medieval glossary

  • Joust of war — In the 13c and 14c England was frequently at war with both France and Scotland. Such wars rarely involved full scale pitched battles; rather, there were skirmishes and much plundering of the countryside. From this came a variation of the sport… …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Joust of War — Very common during the Hundred Years War or at an emprise, this was the same as a joust of peace except that the tips of the lances were sharpened rather than purposefully blunt. Knights were frequently killed or wounded in these engagements, and …   Medieval glossary

  • Coronal — The crown like end of a lance used in a peaceful joust. The idea was that several points would distribute the thrust wider than a single pointed lance. [< Lat. coronalis = like a wreath or crown] Cf. Joust of peace; Joust of war; Arms, Statute …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Tournaments — Introduced to England as *Conflictus Gallicus, a tournament was a somewhat chaotic affair, known as a * melee from which our use of the word. At first, the melee took place in open countryside, with a large number of knights and their attendants …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Tourney — Introduced to England as *Conflictus Gallicus, a tournament was a somewhat chaotic affair, known as a * melee from which our use of the word. At first, the melee took place in open countryside, with a large number of knights and their attendants …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • A outrance — The term used to describe jousting in a hostile manner, when injury or death were expected and even wished for. Jousting could also be a plaisir, for pleasure. [< OldFr. outrance = beyond bounds, extreme; Fr. a outrance = to the bitter end] Cf …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • A plaisir — Term used to describe jousting for pleasure, as a test of skill, rather than mortal combat. In such an event points were variously scored. Cf. A outrance; Joust of peace; Joust of war …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

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